Ironman Nutrition: Racing & Training on the Low Carb High Fat Diet
Ironman Nutrition: Racing & Training on the Low Carb High Fat Diet

Ironman Nutrition: Racing & Training on the Low Carb High Fat Diet

Ironman Nutrition: Racing & Training on the Low Carb High Fat Diet

Today on The Kona Edge, we catch up with Wes Thompson to chat about his approach to his Ironman nutrition.

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Go longer with SFuels.

Train your body to use fat for fuel.  SFules helps you go longer & avoid the dreaded spike or bonk

They contain no sugars, honey, syrups, sugar alcohols, wheat, oats or cheap protein, which helps avoid gut and GI distress.

If you’re in the United States and would like to try SFuels out, simply click on button below and they’ll send you a FREE box.  (They’ll even cover the shipping)

SFuels was recently launched in the ultra running space and the response has been phenomenal! See for yourself what the buzz is all about about.

Don’t delay, the free sample boxes of SFuels are limited.

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Transcription:

BRAD BROWN: Nutrition o’clock here on The Kona Edge and we head back to New South Wales to catch up with Wes Thompson. Wes welcome back. Thanks for joining us.

We haven’t touched at all on nutrition. Are you pretty anal about it? Are you very set in your ways? Tell me about your nutrition approach.

Fuel your triathlon motor with good nutrition

WES THOMPSON: Nutrition approach, I do take it seriously. I think the deeper you get in this triathlon game you’ve got to fuel the motor with the good stuff and in my household we do find ourselves eating quite well. In the last 18 months to 2 years, I’ve cut sugar from my diet.

I have followed to a degree, the lower carb higher fat route, but not to the extremes of ketosis or anything like that. But I have cut a lot of bread, I don’t eat much pasta and I do find myself eating a lot more healthy fats. That certainly helps the body recover and also storing the good fuel sources. So yes, we take it seriously. And it is good eating so it’s a win-win.

BRAD BROWN: I wanted to ask, since cutting out sugars and cutting down the carbs and eating better fats, what’s the response in your body been like? What sort of results have you seen? Have you seen a marked difference?

Eat good fats for greater results in your Ironman performance

WES THOMPSON: Well, I feel a lot better. I have noticed that during an Ironman race you do feel like you can go longer and deeper. Although you’re kidding yourself if you don’t eat during race day. If you think you’re going to just be fat fuelled to the end, that’s just not true. You’ve still got to take in all the junk and the sugar and the gels and splashing coke in your face on the run.

There’s no avoiding that but I think the eating well day in day out even when you’re not training for a race, can only be a good thing.

BRAD BROWN: Looking at a general week, not in the build up to race week, what’s your approach? What would a typical breakfast, lunch and dinner look like for example?

Boost your Ironman nutrition with a good breakfast

WES THOMPSON: Breakfast, I’m big on eggs. Eggs for breakfast. Half the reason I do this triathlon thing is because I’m a huge breakfast fan. I love my breakfast, I love coming in from a session and poaching up some eggs. And I’ll have, like I said I haven’t cut all bread out, but I’ll have a piece of toast and a nice coffee with my breakfast. It’s a pretty good way to start the day.

My wife is actually an ultra runner and she’s very fussy with her diet too and she makes sure the food that we eat in this house is all good. So yes, we all eat quite well.

Dinner wise, we do lots of leafy green salads. Like I said I don’t eat rice. Rice tends to stodge me. I don’t eat a lot of bread but I have the odd slice of sourdough which is quite easy on the gut. Just the good stuff, lots of avocado, lots of olive oil. You can’t go wrong, there’s always something good in the pantry and it doesn’t always have to contain sugar.

BRAD BROWN: Yes absolutely. As far as race day itself goes, tell me about your approach to fuelling and nutrition for an Ironman.

WES THOMPSON: I’ve done a few now so I do kind of know what works.

BRAD BROWN: Are you still tinkering on your nutrition or have you figured out something that works and you’re sticking by it?

Tinkering your Ironman nutrition so you don’t blow it

WES THOMPSON: I think I’m still tinkering but I know with my last race at Ironman Australia this year 2017, I think I blew in the nutrition a little bit. Without going into too much detail there.

To answer your first question, race day I like to have the proverbial bowl of oatmeal or porridge at least 3 hours out from race start. As much as it is a carbohydrate, I do like to have a big knob of grass fed butter in there and a tablespoon of pecan cream to get some fat in there as well. I think that’s a good slow burner that one. That effectively is digestible at race start and I just drink water up until race start.

Let the body settle down on race day then start Ironman nutrition

I won’t have anything to eat until about half an hour into the ride when things have settled down. The body has settled down your guts, you’re in your aero position and you have yourself in your bike. That’s when I’ll start taking on some Hana bars because they’re all natural, they’re easy to eat, they’re easy to chew, the go down well and I’ll probably eat solids.

I’ll have Hana bars for the first half of the ride and then I’ll progress onto the gels. But I do, with the gels on the bike; I have come up with my own formula. I do use EFS Crow which is a little bit of an electrolyte energy drink and I also top up each bottle with 2 desert spoons of pure glucose powder. I find that works well for me. Gets me to the end of the bike then you’re all business for the run.

Mistakes we learn not to repeat in our Ironman nutrition

I will take gels on the run; I’ll probably have a gel every 20 to 30 minutes, electrolytes along the way. Like I said I made the mistake of getting on the coke too soon in the last race, I thought I would rely on that through the course of the run and I sort of blew that a little bit. That’s a fast burner. It might be good until the next aid station. I’d give myself an upper cut that last race and I won’t be repeating that again.

BRAD BROWN: Lesson learnt.

WES THOMPSON: Lesson learnt, yes.

BRAD BROWN: Wes as always, great to catch up. Thanks for your time here on The Kona Edge. I loved chatting to you about your approach to the sport and best of luck in the build up to your next one and 2018 and beyond.

WES THOMPSON: Cheers Brad and I’m flattered that you contacted me for these interviews. Thanks for the chat, it’s been great.

 

About Us

Brad Brown is a 40 something age grouper that dreams of one day qualifying for and racing on the big island (He may have to outlive everyone in his age group though).

Morbidly obese in 2009, Brad clocked in at 165kgs (363lbs) at his heaviest.

He's subsequently lost a third of his body weight on the way to a half Ironman pb of 5:06 and a full Ironman pb of 12:21.

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