Ironman Nutrition: The foundation for Ironman triathlon success
Ironman Nutrition: The foundation for Ironman triathlon success

Ironman Nutrition: The foundation for Ironman triathlon success

Ironman Nutrition: The foundation for Ironman triathlon success

Kristian Hindkjaer comes from a Sports Science background. On this edition of The Kona Edge he shares why Ironman nutrition is one of the most important things to focus on.

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Go longer with SFuels.

Train your body to use fat for fuel.  SFules helps you go longer & avoid the dreaded spike or bonk

They contain no sugars, honey, syrups, sugar alcohols, wheat, oats or cheap protein, which helps avoid gut and GI distress.

If you’re in the United States and you’d like to try SFuels out, simply click on button below and they’ll send you a FREE box.  (They’ll even cover the shipping)

SFuels was recently launched in the ultra running space and the response has been phenomenal! See for yourself what the buzz is all about about.

Don’t delay, the free sample boxes of SFuels are limited.

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Transcription:

BRAD BROWN: Let’s talk some Ironman nutrition now as we head back to Denmark.

Kristian Hindkjaer, welcome back onto the podcast. Thanks for joining us.

We haven’t touched on nutrition at all in our previous chats. Coming from a Sports Science background I know you say you’re a bit of a nerd when it comes to analysing things. I’m sure you’ve done lots of analysis around your nutrition.

The most important thing to focus on – your Ironman Nutrition

KRISTIAN HINDKJAER:  Yes, I guess you can say that. I think it’s just as important, especially on Ironman and long distance racing. It’s one of the most important things you have to focus on.

If you get that wrong everything else will also be wrong. That is the energy that you need to perform. There’s no way around it, it’s just really important.

BRAD BROWN: Let’s talk about your approach when you’re not racing, just general everyday nutrition. Have you got any hard and fast rules? What do you eat? What do you stay away from? That sort of thing.

Get what you need from your Ironman nutrition

KRISTIAN HINDKJAER:  Actually, I’m not that fanatical about what I eat in my daily training and routines. I have some good, healthy choices like oatmeal for breakfast and so on. Some go-to stuff that I do have.

It’s more a matter of getting what I need. Instead of looking at a lot of stuff that I can have and stuff that you have to starve yourself. I think the key is to get what you need. Protein, carbohydrates, so that you’re ready for the next session is so important.

If you don’t treat yourself well in terms of carbohydrates and protein, your training is also just junk. I allow myself to eat a lot.

BRAD BROWN: As far as your nutrition when it comes to training and making sure you’re fuelling correctly, what do you do around training? Is there anything specific you do for every session, or how does it work?

Set your recovery sessions up with good Ironman nutrition

KRISTIAN HINDKJAER:  For swimming it’s mainly not having too much food in my stomach because it will just get me bloated for the next session of the day. A light meal with a low fibre content. Not too much volume just before the swim. Usually I swim in the morning so it’s pretty easy. That could be just a small bun with some honey on or maybe some kind of energy or something in the morning. Then I would have a real breakfast after the swim.

I think to make your recovery good between every session you have to focus as much on carbohydrates as you do on protein. So just loading up between every session is also very important.

BRAD BROWN: And then racing wise, how do you approach an Ironman? Tell me about your nutrition strategy for racing.

What does the sciences say about your Ironman nutrition?

KRISTIAN HINDKJAER:  In Ironman racing I think it’s a matter of getting as much energy and water as you can take, without getting bloated. So it’s just looking at the science and what they say about how much a person can usually take in per hour. It might be something like 70 to 80g carbohydrates per hour.

I will try it out in training to see if it works and maybe just push it a little bit to see where the limit is and get in as much as possible. Also, mix different carbohydrates. Like fortosa and natrodine, for example. Use all the transport coatings in your stomach.

BRAD BROWN: And when it comes to the bike and the run, are you a gels guy, are you a solids guy? How do you break things up?

Solid energies vs fluid energies in your Ironman nutrition

KRISTIAN HINDKJAER:  Actually, in races I like to go mostly on fluid energy like gels and energy drinks. That’s just easier for me to consume and of course Ironman is a long day. So maybe on the bike I will have something like an energy bar not to get too hungry before the finish line. But mostly fluid energy.

BRAD BROWN: Brilliant. Kristian it’s been great catching up. Thank you so much for sharing your journey with us. We look forward to following your progress.

I’m sure you will eventually get back to Kona whether it’s as a pro or an age grouper, but we look forward to seeing you racing there once again.

KRISTIAN HINDKJAER:  Yes, I hope so. Thanks for having me.

About Us

Brad Brown is a 40 something age grouper that dreams of one day qualifying for and racing on the big island (He may have to outlive everyone in his age group though).

Morbidly obese in 2009, Brad clocked in at 165kgs (363lbs) at his heaviest.

He's subsequently lost a third of his body weight on the way to a half Ironman pb of 5:06 and a full Ironman pb of 12:21.

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